Zigzag is a homewares store that uses Denmark as a convenient cipher for designed simplicity and all-round wholesomeness.

The logo on this storefront says Zigzag The Danish Spirit. But this is Liège, eastern Belgium, and quite a distance from the land of Carlsberg and sizzling bacon. Zigzag is in fact a homewares store that uses Denmark as a convenient cipher for designed simplicity and all-round wholesomeness.

There are nine branches in the land that Brits love to mock and Zigzag is that rare beast, an impulse-based offer. The kind of place that makes you think about buying things that you really had no idea that you either needed or wanted.

It does so by dint of an apparent openness of store design - a stripped-down simplicity intended to make you think that the wool is not being pulled over your eyes. This is achieved through the now well-worn pop-up shop trick of using unshaded pendant light bulbs to give a rough-and-ready feel to the space, as well as plain wood packing crates, used as storage and as mid-floor and perimeter equipment.

Now couple all of this with stripped pine panelling for the walls, add a concrete floor and stack the stock in a semi-random manner, and you have a format that invites you to browse.

As this is in a mall, there are no doors, meaning that shoppers can stare deep into the shop. If you did not know better, given the low prices of the merchandise and the temporary feel of the fit-out,

you really might suspect this to be a pop-up store.

It is a strange world indeed where mainstream, or almost so, retailers

are taking their store and visual merchandising design cues from shops that are here today and gone tomorrow.