It’s a few weeks before Levi’s reveals what’s been going on in its Regent Street flagship, but this is a brand that knows how to ratchet up the marketing ante and generate excitement.

It’s a few weeks before Levi’s reveals what’s been going on in its Regent Street flagship, but this is a brand that knows how to ratchet up the marketing ante and generate excitement.

If you’d passed the store a couple of weeks ago, you’d have noticed a pretty standard hoarding, telling anybody who might be interested that a major remodelling was underway.

Bearing in mind the economic climate of the last 18 months, there would be nothing terribly unusual about a hoarding. After all, in some locations, hoardings have become almost as prevalent as shops - although this is changing.

Levi’s, however, has done things a little differently. Around 10 days ago, the first hoarding was replaced by another, looking as if it had been fashioned from freshly-cast copper. The choice of material may perhaps have something to do with the heritage of using copper rivets to create the jeans for which the brand is famous, but the net effect was show-stopping and the store is quite the shiniest thing on a street full of shiny things.

Whether this will make people flock to the store when the final reveal is made remains a moot point, but if nothing else it will get noticed. The only real question is whether spending on this scale before a store has even opened is really worth it.

So consider the evidence. It is a curious fact that the most interesting looking space along Regent Street at the moment has yet to open, the Apple store notwithstanding. And there is an awful lot of competition along the strip, whether it’s the somewhat garish Ferrari store, the new Gant flagship or perhaps the Banana Republic outlet.

A desire to understand what is about to happen next pervades all our everyday activities and so ensuring that passers-by know that change is underway must be a prerequisite for stimulating the shopping gene (no pun intended, at least initially).

All of which would seem to indicate that Levi’s is bang on the money in the way that it is handling the pre-opening build-up. There is, of course, the danger that if you make too much noise about something, then the reality may disappoint. Given its past record however, it seems unlikely that Levi’s will disappoint in this respect and perhaps other retailers might take notice.

There is a tendency to ‘trade through’ store refurbishments that means that when the work is finally completed there is a danger that it may go unnoticed, no matter what has been done. Making visual noise, a lot of it, would seem a simple way of ensuring this does not happen.