Amanda Phillips, Managing director and head of strategy at Volume, shares her view of good and bad sites.

Good site: EE.co.uk

EE

EE

EE arguably has a head start already - new sites are likely to offer a better user experience because they will have conformed to recent design trends and best practices.

Even so, the EE site should be commended for its concise, high-level content and use of imagery. The key is to hook the user in early with just enough information - if users are interested they will choose to dig for details.

EE’s ‘plan builder’ is a great example of information being presented in a clean manner. Content is stripped down, allowing for oversized graphics and clear signposts to the path to purchase for the customer.

Bad site: Vodafone.co.uk

Vodafone

Vodafone

Vodafone is an older and more traditional brand and that is reflected in the appearance of its site, which is very text-based, using little imagery to entice the user.

Key calls to action lead the user to a complex-looking list of phones and the latest offers appear to be hidden, making it hard for the user to identify deals and promotions.

Ultimately, bad user experience is created when the journey is not clearly marked out or when the user has to combat additional tasks, obstacles and decisions that have nothing to do with their original objective and, in the case of Vodafone, not having calls to action easily visible.