It is normally the practice in this part of the magazine to showcase stores that are either, new, unfamiliar or both, so the choice of a Zara store on Oxford Street this week might seem curious.

It is normally the practice in this part of the magazine to showcase stores that are either, new, unfamiliar or both, so the choice of a Zara store on Oxford Street this week might seem curious.

It is the windows wot won it for this store - and actually just one of them.

This is the catwalk scene to the left of the main door. If someone were to mention this without providing an image you might be inclined to think hmm…another catwalk window, then. But this one has elements of an early 1990s Gaultier show or maybe an event put together by John Galliano.

What we have here, in short, is a mid-market operator that has created a window scheme that offers a peek into the world of luxury and it has done so on a very limited budget and in a manner that will allow it to be rolled out both with the minimum of fuss and the maximum of effect. This is achieved by making everything white, using a group of predominantly female mannequins with improbably elongated physiques and identical faces, giving the impression of a cluster of post-apocalyptic Stepford Wives with a lot of attitude.

There are a couple of male figures, just to show that this is a store that caters for both sexes, one sporting a Mohican and the other with no hair whatsoever and dark glasses. Now bathe the whole thing in harsh white light and you have a window that is as striking as anything on Oxford Street.

Once again, proof that good visual merchandising should not be over-complicated and that if you want to make passers-by stop and stare, then monochrome is generally a good idea.