What’s in a name? Well, if you believe Katie Hopkins - the former Apprentice contestant and now chief protagonist and number one villain of daytime TV - everything.

What’s in a name? Well, if you believe Katie Hopkins - the former Apprentice contestant and now chief protagonist and number one villain of daytime TV - everything.

If you’re called Tyler, Charmaine or Chardonnay, you won’t be invited round to play at her house. Sorry, but you’re just not posh enough. Your dearth of manners and charm will unduly influence her children.

This name debate was the tabloid prelude to the birth of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s son. Of course, there was never going to be a Wayne or Dwayne Windsor, but you can bet that the naming of the new third-in-line to the throne was widely discussed internally, such is the importance of the royal brand.

Will and Kate are seen as modernisers with a strong sense of history. George is a strong, traditional name for an English king but also the brand in the back of his subjects’ school shirts. George is both posh and ‘of the people’, so it was a perfect choice.

And fair play to Asda for making the most of it. I loved the little crown on its logo, the royal reserved parking bay and the 20% off for George customers.

I’d like to think the royals’ populist touch extended to choosing Alexander as a middle name after Sir Alex Ferguson, and that they originally wanted Lewis for the third name, after the nation’s favourite retailer, but were overruled by Palace officials, so they compromised with Louis.

The name above the two shops that we acquired back in the 1970s was Ann Summers. But who was she? I can tell you she was an ‘English rose’ - in the minds of those who created her.

A slightly ironic, conservative-sounding counterpoint to the then probable perception of the ‘scarlet woman’ who enjoyed the risqué products the stores sold back then.

In many ways the spirit of our brand name has served us well. We have spent decades celebrating female sexuality and unleashing female sexual confidence - having a genteel sounding name has helped show that it’s ‘normal’ to enjoy the products we sell.

Of course, more important than the original idea behind a name is the series of promises we make to consumers that shape our brand. After all, if it were all about the name you’d never fly with a Virgin or own one of those über cool, 1950s-style fridges.

These promises are made by our products, our stores and by our staff. Our product promises are all about efficacy and aesthetics. Our stores are about efficiency and ambience. And most people think that our store colleagues’ promises are about service and knowledge.

But the best retail brands recognise that their store teams have a higher purpose than that - their people are the living epitome of the brand.

Recruiting brand enthusiasts is key to making this happen, but as important is the continual sharing of your mission in life. Our brand essence is to fearlessly unleash sexual confidence and our vision to make every woman feel like the sexiest woman in the world. That’s certainly what we want our name to stand for.

  • Jacqueline Gold is chief executive of Ann Summers